The SRP in Future

 
the-srp-in-future

In April 2012 the SRP committee received a report from a working group set up to consider how the Society should serve its members and the wider community and support the continuation and development of recorder playing in the UK up to 2020. You can read the report here and branch secretaries all have paper copies.

Have your say

The committee is keen to collect the views of SRP members and the wider recorder community on the proposals in this report. This page is therefore a forum on which everyone is encouraged to express their opinion. Please do contribute by submitting your comments on the form below. We hope this will become a lively debate.

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Please Note

When commenting on a particular recommendation, please include a heading like “Recommendation 10″. When commenting on a particular section, please include a heading like “Section 2.4 page 10″.

Last updated May 31, 2013

  6 Responses to “The SRP in Future”

  1. Thank you Steve, Tessa, Naomi and Enid for such a comprehensive report – it must have taken hours of your time.

    If the society wants to attract new younger (but not young) members I think your ideas to develop the website more are good . The world increasingly communicates in this way – quite a few members communicate on facebook I hear other organisations talking about how effective Tweets can be. I think too that you may well have underestimated the number of members with computers. Quite often an email address can be extracted from members who have not disclosed it in the members; directory.

    One of the key dilemmas for me seems to be how to get people who are doing something for their own pleasure to own the aims around charitable status. Even when there is some kind of willingness for a branch to do something there may not be the resources in terms of ability, time commitment to carry it out to a high standard. For instance I am sure that in the current climate there are schools in our area who would welcome some kind of input – but a performance needs to be targetted well and polished enough to interest the children and if we think about taking groups we could only start if we are prepared to take on that regular commitment.

    Finally if you want to really communicate these findings with members and others an abridged more visual version or even video would be better. It’s a long read.

    Ann Tuesley

  2. Generally a comprehensive review. However one aspect seems to be missing. The contribution made by Further Education. The Essex Branch grew out of an evening class, run by the local further education committee. After the Essex Branch was formed, the evening class continued for a great many years and became a route for new players to join the branch having reached a nominal standard.

    I note the range of comments about the magazine. Your correspondents are likely to be the type of member that appreciates the content. Over the years I have gathered the impression that very few members read the material, as I regret that they are only really interested in the SRP as a means of regular recorder playing and are not interested in the finer points that the magazine contains. It is printed and presented at a very high quality. Is it possible that it is a bit too good?

    I know that one member did leave this branch as she did not wish to be constrained to take the magazine. She was an academic!

    Roy Simons

    Age 88

  3. Music, as a listener or performer is a subject that is not sufficiently valued in all schools. From my own experience I was employed to teach recorder throughout a primary school until the grant ran out. Thenwith my time finished there was no-ne left to continue, so I assume they do not have lessons now.
    Certainly, forging links with the education authorities, parents and schools, as well as concerts given in schools are a way forward.

  4. Congratulations on a very comprehensive and thought-provoking report. 83 Resolutions, although worthy, would be challenging to implement in 8 years. It would be roughly one Resolution resolved each month. Maybe it is not intended to achieve them all by 2020.
    Section 3.5 page 22. Has the Society considered offering Life Membership? This would be for the SRP portion of the annual sub only, Branch portion to be paid yearly.
    Advantage to Society – the money is paid upfront and is non-refundable; would give good value for money to a committed player; Life Members less likely to leave the Society; might appeal to ‘inbetweeners’ who have greater disposable income than the young or very mature.
    Disadvantage – the initial amount would be huge; The Society would ultimately lose out financially with long-serving members; would add another category to the Membership returns for hard-pressed Membership Secretaries.

    • Section 3.5 page 22. Life membership. Some other Societies do offer life membership. One advantage might be that a lump sum invested could generate income in it’s own right. Whether that would be beneficial in the current financial climate with low interest rates could perhaps be investigated.

  5. Recommendation 80. Whilst a regular survey sounds like a good idea, it might lead to survey overload. It might be counter-productive to send a survey to all the members each time. It might be better to have occasional targetted surveys addressing specific questions.

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